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Full text of "Announcements"

Catholic Theological Union 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1972-1973 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Incorporated by the State of Illinois, 
as an Institution of Higher Education, 
November 27, 1967. 

Approved as a Degree-Granting Insti- 
tution by the Department of Higher Edu- 
cation, State of Illinois, September, 1969. 

Accredited by the American Association 
of Theological Schools, January, 1972. 

Accredited by the North Central Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Secondary Schools, 
March, 1972. 

Charter Member, The Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools, 1970. 

Approved for Veterans' Benefits, Title 
38, U.S. Code, Chapter 36, September 23, 
1970. 

Authorized under Federal Law to enroll 
non-immigrant alien students, October 28, 
1971. 

Member of the National Catholic Edu- 
cational Association, The Association of 
Clinical Pastoral Education, The Midwest 
Association of Theological Schools, the 
Association of Chicago Theological Schools. 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 
AT CHICAGO 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1972-1973 



The Franciscans 

Sacred Heart Province 
The Passionists 

Holy Cross Province 
The Servites 

Eastern Province 
Society of The Divine Word 

Northern Province 

5401 South Cornell Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60615 
(312) 324-8000 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



4 CALENDAR 

5 GENERAL INFORMATION 

13 ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

19 STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

23 ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

43 COURSES OF STUDY 

61 REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1972-1973 



Fall Quarter 

Sept. 25-29: Orientation, Faculty Week 

Sept. 29: Late Registration 

Oct. 2: Fall Quarter Begins 

Nov. 1 : Cluster Inter-school workshops 

Nov. 23-26: Thanksgiving Recess 

Dec. 5-6: Registration for Winter Quarter 

Dec. 11-15: Week of Study and Exams 

Dec. 15: End of Fall Quarter (4:00 P.M.) 



Winter Quarter 



Jan. 2 
Feb. 2-4 
Feb. 26 
Feb. 27-28 
Mar. 12-16 
Mar. 16 



Winter Quarter Begins, Late Registration 
Mid-Quarter Weekend 
Founders' Day 

Registration for Spring Quarter 

Week of Study and Exams 

End of Winter Quarter (4:00 P.M.) 



Mar. 26 
Apr. 19-22 
May 17-18 
May 26-28 
May 31 -June 1 
June 1 



Spring Quarter 

Spring Quarter Begins, Late Registration 
Easter Recess 

Registration for Fall Quarter 
Memorial Weekend 
Examinations 

End of Spring Quarter (4:00 P.M.) 



4 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




HISTORY 
PURPOSE 

BUILDING AND LOCATION 

LIBRARY 

CLASSROOMS 

ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

FEES 



HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 



The Catholic Theological Union is a product of the open-window 
attitude of Vatican Council II. The documents on the Church, Reli- 
gious Liberty, Ecumenism, and the Church and the Modern World, 
charter a new age for the Roman Catholic Church. The seminary 
must be re-shaped in accord with the new spirit. On it, more than 
any other institution, depends the attainment of the Council's vision. 

On the American scene, there was a creative response to the call 
to seminary renewal. It became evident that the day of the isolated, 
small, often under-staffed seminary had passed. Catholic seminaries 
would do well to move into collaborative arrangements in order to 
pool resources of faculty, library and finances. Also, they must enter 
into the mainstream of American seminary education by ecumenical 
and educational contacts with Protestant seminaries. By and large, 
the Catholic Church in the United States is an urban institution. It 
was felt by many educators that the optimum location for the semi- 
nary is in a large city, near Protestant seminaries, and if possible, 
in a university environment. 

In May, 1964, Cardinal Suenens visited the University of Chicago 
for a series of lectures and ecumenical dialogue. As a result of his 
visit, Dean Jerald Brauer of the Divinity School met with representa- 
tives of Catholic orders to discuss the possibility of a Catholic semi- 
nary in the environs of the University. 

Three orders were intensely interested and began planning for a 
combined seminary: the Franciscans, the Servites, and the Pas- 
sionists. 

The Franciscans of Sacred Heart Province had conducted St. Joseph 
Seminary at Teutopolis, Illinois since 1862. The Passionists of the 
Midwest Province, had opened their theologate in St. Louis in 1906. 
The Servite Seminary at Lake Bluff, Illinois, was successor to the 
first Servite Seminary in Chicago, dating from 1880. 

A formal petition for approval of the proposed seminary was 
forwarded to Rome by Cardinal Cody in May, 1966. Upon favorable 
reply from the Sacred Congregation of Seminaries, the Cardinal gave 



6 



his approval for the establishment of a combined seminary of the 
three orders near the University of Chicago, in January, 1967. 

Planning moved ahead very rapidly. General faculty meetings 
were held in May, 1967, September, 1967, and February, 1968. Com- 
mittees for curriculum, administration, spiritual formation, and real 
estate, studied their respective areas. 

A Board of Trustees was elected in August, 1967, and petitioned 
the State of Illinois for incorporation of a school of theology, the 
Catholic Theological Union at Chicago. After careful investigation 
of the purposes, faculty, library resources and financial assets of the 
proposed school, the State of Illinois granted corporate status to the 
Catholic Theological Union in November, 1967. 

After prolonged study of sites and buildings, it was decided to pur- 
chase the Aragon Hotel, 5401 S. Cornell, in East Hyde Park, a loca- 
tion some eight blocks from the campus of the University. This 
200 room hotel could be adapted for use during the initial years of 
the school. As the venture developed, operations could be moved 
closer to the campus. 

Catholic Theological Union opened its doors in the fall quarter 
of 1968 with a faculty of 24 and an enrollment of 108. 

In July, 1969, the American Association of Theological Schools 
granted associate membership to Catholic Theological Union. In 
September, 1969, the Advisory Commission on Degree Granting 
Institutions of the Department of Higher Education, State of Illinois, 
empowered Catholic Theological Union to grant the degrees of 
Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Theology. 

Preparation for full accreditation moved rapidly ahead. In Octo- 
ber, 1971, C.T.U. was visited by an evaluating team representing the 
American Association of Theological Schools and the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. In January, 1972, 
C.T.U. was accredited by the American Association of Theological 
Schools and in March, 1972, received accreditation from the North 
Central Association. 

Catholic Theological Union has shown a steady growth. In July, 
1970, the Northern Province of the Society of the Divine Word, 
which had conducted Holy Spirit Seminary in Techny, Illinois, since 
1880, became the fourth member of the Catholic Theological Union 
Corporation. Five other religious orders have elected to send stu- 



7 



dents to C.T.U. on a tuition basis: the Augustinians, the Norbertines, 
the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart, the Society of the Precious 
Blood, and the Congregation of the Holy Ghost. The Claretians, 
the Viatorians, and the Crosier Fathers have students enrolled for 
the fall of 1972. 

Catholic Theological Union is a charter member of the Chicago 
Cluster of Theological Schools, an association of five Protestant and 
three Roman Catholic Schools of Theology located in Hyde Park and 
the western suburbs. The Cluster has inaugurated full cross-registra- 
tion for courses, shared library privileges, and other forward looking 
educational collaboration. 

A collaborative program, by which a student at C.T.U. can earn 
the degree of Master of Arts in Theology from De Paul University, 
went into effect in the fall of 1969. This arrangement described on 
page 36 gives C.T.U. students a challenging option in their prepara- 
tion for ministry. 

Catholic Theological Union is now ending its fourth year of op- 
eration. It has achieved a greater internal unity and more precise 
definition of purpose. It has been accepted by its peers in the world 
of theological education. There is solid ground for hope that this 
new venture, unique among Catholic seminaries, will continue to 
develop and prosper. 



PURPOSE OF THE CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 

The basic purpose of Catholic Theological Union is given in the 
by-laws: "To train and teach men aspiring to the Roman Catholic 
priesthood so that they may be fully qualified to meet the require- 
ments of such priesthood." 

There is a living sense of purpose which guides a school more 
effectively, perhaps, than any written statement. From the very be- 
ginning it was understood that C.T.U. would be a school for min- 
istry. Theology would be directed to practice. Nevertheless, as an 
institution becomes more deeply aware of its identity, it seeks to 
elucidate its purposes more precisely. 

In preparation for accreditation, the Committee on Academic 



8 



Affairs, made up of five faculty members, three administrators, and 
four students moved to formulate a more fully elaborated state- 
ment of purpose. Some ten meetings in all were required before a 
statement that was acceptable to the C.T.U. community was finally 
hammered out. The statement reads as follows: 

The Catholic Theological Union is dedicated to the educa- 
tion of students interested in ministering to the contemporary 
world as Roman Catholic priests. It also welcomes students in- 
terested in a graduate theological education in preparation for 
a variety of Christian ministries. 

Its vision of the effective minister includes a mastery of the 
Christian heritage, a basic understanding of the other religious 
traditions, individual maturity and sensitivity to the human and 
religious needs of men today, the ability for personal theologi- 
cal reflection and the communication of religious insights and 
values to others. 

It assures each participating community and diocese all the 
courses necessary for ordination in the Roman Catholic priest- 
hood. The school offers programs culminating in degrees of 
Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Theology. The thrust 
of this school includes a strong academic program that en- 
courages serious theological research both on part of the faculty 
and of the students. 

The Catholic Theological Union envisions itself as an in- 
tegral part of the cluster of theological schools in the University 
area. Its role within the cluster is to offer a Roman Catholic 
presence and it commits itself to utilizing this ecumenical set- 
ting as far as possible in constructing its theological program. 

A statement of purpose and goals is never absolute. It is rather 
an attempt to state where we are at the moment. Such a statement 
would be expected to reflect the hopes, ambiguities, tensions, and 
contradictions that exist among the trustees, administration, faculty, 
students, and the institutions which the school serves. It is like a 
political platform which is broad enough to include the goals of 
all and at the same time not precise enough to include in detail the 
particular agenda of each interest group. The lack of precision is 
seen as a strength rather than a weakness. Precision can divide 
as well as unite. 



9 



BUILDING AND LOCATION 



The Catholic Theological Union occupies a nine-story building 
containing some 200 rooms plus lounge areas and dining facilities. 
On the first floor are the receptionist's offices, a large lounge, the 
dining room and other service areas. The administrative offices, 
faculty offices, faculty lounge and seminar rooms are located on the 
second floor. The library and library offices occupy the entire third 
floor. The remaining six floors furnish residence for the faculty and 
students, with individual community chapels and recreational facili- 
ties. 

It is not required that students reside in the CTU building. Some 
communities prefer separate living arrangements. One group of 
Franciscans live in an apartment community near the school. The 
Augustinians reside about one mile from CTU. Holy Spirit Priory 
in nearby Kenwood serves as the Norbertine residence. The Divine 
Word community leases apartments owned by the Lutheran School 
of Theology. Servite Hall is located in two townhouses in a nearby 
housing development. 

The Catholic Theological Union is located in the Hyde Park- 
Kenwood area of Chicago's south side. This is a cosmopolitan, vital 
community, with a strong sense of identity. Within walking distance 
are shopping centers, theaters, restaurants, churches, parks, the Lake 
Michigan beaches and the Museum of Science and Industry. Down- 
town Chicago is less than 15 minutes away by car or rapid transit. 
It is close to the University of Chicago and to the several schools of 
theology in the area: Chicago Theological Seminary, Lutheran 
School of Theology, Meadville Theological School, and the Bellar- 
mine School of Theology. 

An open seminary in a large city demands considerable maturity 
of the student. On the other hand, in what other atmosphere is 
there the possibility for the kind of emotional and professional 
growth needed for the priest who will spend the greater part of 
his life in an urban surrounding? 



10 



LIBRARY 



The entire third floor of the Catholic Theological Union houses 
the library. The area has been renovated to contain a large reading 
and reference room. Besides offices for the library staff, there are 
cataloging and work rooms. 

The present collection consists of 60,000 volumes, a combination 
of the libraries of two of the charter members of CTU. In addition, 
the extensive missiological collection of the Divine Word Seminary 
library has been incorporated into the CTU library. The collection 
represents some 5,000 volumes in Mission Studies and the History 
and Religions. Virtually all of the necessary periodicals for theo- 
logical study and related areas of research, some 450 in number, 
are currently being received. 

Students of Catholic Theological Union enjoy reciprocal library 
privileges with the seven other schools of the Chicago Cluster, name- 
ly the Lutheran School of Theology, Chicago Theological Seminary, 
Bellarmine School of Theology, Meadville-Lombard School of The- 
ology (all in Hyde Park), as well as Bethany Theological Seminary, 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, and De Andreis Theological 
Seminary, in the Western suburbs. The total holdings of the Clus- 
ter schools number 570,000 volumes, and form the second largest 
Cluster theological library in this country. 

The library is connected with the other libraries of the Cluster 
by a teletype service, which gives instant contact for inquiries con- 
cerning titles and other library sharing. A daily courier service 
exchanges books among the various Cluster libraries. 

The library is under the direction of two full time librarians, each 
with extensive background in both theology and library science. 



CLASSROOMS 



The education building of the Chicago Sinai Congregation is 
located at 5350 South Shore Drive, one block east of CTU. By 
special arrangement one floor of the education building, containing 
eight classrooms, has been made available to CTU. In addition, 



11 



a number of seminar rooms for smaller groups, are located in the 
CTU building. Beginning with the fall of 1972, a number of CTU 
classes will be moved to Chicago Theological Seminary to facilitate 
cross-registration. 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES 



The Lake Michigan beaches and nearby Jackson Park, with golf 
and tennis facilities, are in easy walking distance from CTU. An 
arrangement is in effect by which CTU students make use of the 
Hyde Park YMCA athletic facilities, which include swimming pool, 
gymnasium, squash and hand ball. 



FEES 



Tuition $1,500.00 per year 

500.00 per quarter 

Special Students (for credit or audit) 150.00 per course 

Student Activity Fee 4.00 per quarter 

Board (September 25 to June 2) 775.00 per year 

First Quarter 305.00 

Second Quarter 235.00 

Third Quarter 235.00 

Room (occupancy 9/18-6/9) 750.00 per year 

250.00 per quarter 

Thesis Direction (M. Div. or M.A.) 150.00 



Registration Fee 10.00 

Graduation Fee 25.00 

Transcript of Credits 2.00 



12 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 




OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 
FACULTY 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



President 

Vice President and Dean 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Dean of Students 
Registrar 

Director of Library 



Paul Bechtoid, CP. 
Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. 
Leon Grantz, CP. 
Robert Mallonee, S.V.D. 
John Paul, M.S.C 
Kenneth O'Malley, CP. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Paul Boyle, CP. (Provincial) 

John Donaghey, S.V.D. (Provincial) 

Vitus Duschinsky, O.F.M. (Provincial) 

Justin Ryska, O.S.M. (Provincial) 

Robert Flinn, S.V.D. 

Mark Hegener, O.F.M. 

Robert Kohl, O.F.M. 

Augustine Kulbis, O.S.M. 

Edward McGuinn, S.V.D. 

Daniel O'Malley, O.S.M. 

Terence M. OToole, CP. 

Conleth Overman, CP. 

14 



DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 

John Flynn, O.S.A., M.A. 

Philip J. Haggerty, C.S.Sp., M.A. 

Donald Davelle, C.M.F. 

George Lubeley, C.PP.S., S.T.L. 

Daniel Malain, CP., Th.M. 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D., L.Miss., M.A. 

John Paul, M.S.C, J.C.D. 

John Pawlikowski, O.S.M., Ph.D. 

Harry Speckman, O.F.M., S.T.B. 

James Strommer, CP., M.Div. 



FACULTY 



BOBERG, John, S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Mission Theology; 
S.T.L. , Gregorian University, Rome; D.Miss., Gregorian Uni- 
versity, Rome. 

BONNER, Dismas, O.F.M. Associate Professor of Canon Law; 
J.C.L., The Catholic University of America, Washington; J.C.D. , 
The Catholic University of America, Washington. 

CROTTY, Nicholas, CP. Associate Professor of Ethics; S.T.L., 
University of St. Thomas, Rome; S.T.D., University of St. 
Thomas, Rome. Study, Harvard University. 

DIDEON, Lois, R.C Instructor in Pastoral Psychology and Director 
of Group Reflective Sessions; A.B., University of Seattle; M.A. 
in Theology, Andover Newton Theological School, Newton 
Center, Massachusetts. 

FOURNELLE, Geron, O.F.M. Professor of Old Testament Studies; 
S.T.L., The Catholic University of America, Washington; L.G. 
in Scripture Studies, Studium Biblicum Franciscum, Jerusalem; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome. 



15 



GEANEY, Dennis, O.S.A. Director of Field Education and Asso- 
ciate Professor of Ministry; A.B., Villanova University, Phila- 
delphia; M.A. in Economics, Catholic University of America, 
Washington. 

GOHMANN, Myron, CP., Associate Director of Library; L.Hist.E., 
Gregorian University, Rome; A.M.L.S., Rosary College, River 
Forest, 111. 

HAYES, Zachary, O.F.M. Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theol- 
ogy; S.T.L., Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn, Germany; 
Dr. Theol., Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn, Germany 

ISABELL, Damien, O.F.M. Assistant Professor of Spiritual Theol- 
ogy; S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., Gregorian 
University, Rome. 

JOHNSON, Basil, O.F.M. Instructor in Liturgies; A.B. Quincy Col- 
lege; B.Mus., De Paul University; M.A. in Liturgy, Catholic 
University, Washington; S.T.D. (Cand.), Institut Catholique 
de Paris. 

KARRIS, Robert, O.F.M. Assistant Professor of N.T. Studies; S.T.L., 
Catholic University of America, Washington; Th.D., Harvard 
Divinity School. 

KNIES, Jerome, O.S.A. First Year Program; B.A. Villanova Uni- 
versity, Pittsburgh; S.T.D., Catholic University of America, 
Washington. 

KNITTER, Paul, S.V.D. Instructor in Doctrinal Theology; S.T.B., 
Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.L., Gregorian University, 
Rome; Doctoral Studies, Gregorian University, Rome, and Uni- 
versity of Muenster; Th.D. (Cand.), University of Marburg, 
Germany. 

LANGERHOLZ, Callistus, O.F.M. Associate Professor of New 
Testament Studies; S.T.L., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, 
Rome; S.T.D., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; L.G., 
Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome. 

MacDONALD, Sebastian, CP., Associate Professor of Ethics; S.T.L., 
University of St. Thomas, Rome; S.T.D., University of St. 
Thomas, Rome. Study, Princeton University. 



16 



McELWAIN, Hugh, O.S.M. Professor of Doctrinal Theology; 
S.T.L., Pontifical Theological Faculty Marianum, Rome; S.T.D. 
Pontifical Theological Faculty Marianum, Rome; Study, DePaul 
University and University of Chicago. 

MALLONEE, Robert W, S.V.D. Lecturer in Pastoral Care; M.A., 
Loyola University, Chicago; M.A.L.S., Rosary College, River 
Forest, III.; C.P.E. Training, Lutheran General Hospital, Chi- 
cago, and Wisconsin School for Boys. 

NEMER, Lawrence, S.V.D. Associate Professor of Church History; 
L.Miss., Gregorian University, Rome; M.A. in History, Catholic 
University of America, Washington. 

NEWBOLD, Thomas More, CP. Professor of Pastoral Theology; 
Maitre-es-Sc-Med., L'Institut d'Etude Medievale d'Albert le 
Grand; Ph.D., University of Montreal, Canada. 

O'MALLEY, Kenneth, CP. Director of Library; A.M.L.S., Univer- 
sity of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

OSTDIEK, Gilbert, O.F.M. Academic Dean and Associate Professor 
of Doctrinal Theology; S.T.L., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonia- 
num, Rome; S.T.D., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 
L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; Study, Har- 
vard Divinity School. 

PAWLIKOWSKI, John, O.S.M. Assistant Professor of Ethics; A.B., 
Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

PERELMUTER, Hayim Goren. Chautauqua Professor of Jewish 
Studies; B.A., McGill University, Montreal; M.H.L. Jewish 
Institute of Religion, New York; D.H.L. (Cand.), Hebrew 
Union College-Hebrew University; D.D., Hebrew Union Col- 
lege, Cincinnati. 

SENIOR, Donald, CP. Instructor in New Testament Studies; Bac- 
culareate en Theologie, University of Louvain; S.T.L., Univer- 
sity of Louvain; S.T.D. , University of Louvain. 

SPILL Y, Alphonse, C.PP.S. Instructor of New Testament Studies; 
M.A., University of Dayton; Ph.D. (Cand.), University of 
Chicago. 



17 



STUHLMUELLER, Carroll, CP. Professor of Old Testament 
Studies; S.T.L., The Catholic University of America, Washing- 
ton; S.S.L., The Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; S.S.D., The 
Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; D.H.L., St. Benedict College. 

VANASSE, Roman, O.Praem. Director of M.A. Program and Assist- 
ant Professor of Doctrinal Theology; S.T.L., Gregorian Univer- 
sity, Rome; S.T.D., Gregorian University, Rome; Study, Orien- 
tal Institute, University of Chicago, and Pontifical Biblical In- 
stitute, Rome. 



ADJUNCT FACULTY 

De VAULT, Joseph J, S.J., Ph.D., S.S.L. Bellarmine School of The- 
ology; Visiting Professor Old Testament. 

LOISKANDL, Helmut H., S.V.D, Ph.D. DePaul University; Visit- 
ing Professor of Anthropology. 



18 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 




DEAN OF STUDENTS 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 
WORSHIP 

FORMATION COUNCIL 



DEAN OF STUDENTS 



The Dean of Students is the official representative of the adminis- 
tration for matters of student life at Catholic Theological Union. 
He works closely with the Student Executive Committee and the 
Formation Council. He serves as liaison person between these bodies 
and the administration. The Dean of Students coordinates CTU 
ordinations and common liturgies. He has direct responsibility for 
personal and academic counseling and supervision of students-at- 
large. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The basic organ of student opinion and action at Catholic Theo- 
logical Union is the Student Government. Chartered by its constitu- 
tion, the Student Government coordinates several areas of student 
responsibility and participation in CTU life. The Student Govern- 
ment places representatives on the CTU Senate, and on the principal 
school committees: Admissions, Budget, Library, Curriculum, Rank 
and Recruitment. The Student Government is directed by the Stu- 
dent Executive Committee, headed by a president and vice-president 
elected by the student body. The several participating communities 
also place representatives on the S.E.C. The S.E.C. represents the 
students in matters dealing with the faculty and administration, as 
well as student concerns in the Cluster. The S.E.C. works closely 
with the Dean of Students. 



GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 

The thorough preparation of candidates for the ministry of the 
Catholic priesthood is a task that goes beyond the areas of academic 
and professional instruction. It involves the development of char- 
acter and Christian virtue. Likewise a sense of social responsibility 
must be fostered, bringing the candidate to an awareness of the de- 
mands of selfless service. While this is not the direct responsibility 
of the Catholic Theological Union, it is a matter of notable concern 
for the administration and faculty of the school. This facet of the 
student's development is remanded to the directors of spiritual for- 
mation of the several participating communities. By means of public 
conferences, group discussion and individual guidance sessions, the 
theological student is assisted in formulating ideals of life and serv- 
ice that are essential to commitment in the priestly ministry. 



20 



The Directors of Spiritual Formation live in residence with the 
student community. They are available at all times for consultation 
and advice. Care is taken that this service does not produce depend- 
ent persons, but rather promotes full human and spiritual maturity. 

A full-time staff member with professional training in counseling 
serves as auxiliary counselor and resource person. 



WORSHIP 

An integral aspect of education for ministry is the development 
of a liturgical way of life. The priest is not only a teacher of truth; 
he is president of a worshipping community. Worship in faith has 
ever been considered a necessary adjunct to the fruitful mastery of 
Christian theology. 

At the Catholic Theological Union the participating communities 
determine their own prayer and worship schedule. A school chapel 
is available for the use of all the communities. On major Church 
festivals and other appropriate occasions the school holds official 
liturgies for the entire faculty and student body. These liturgies 
are cordinated by the Dean of Students with the assistance of the 
Professor of Liturgy and a student committee. Besides communal 
worship, students are also expected to devote time each day to per- 
sonal reflection and private prayer. 



FORMATION COUNCIL 

The Formation Council is made up of the directors of spiritual 
formation of all communities of Catholic Theological Union. It 
provides a forum through which the directors share insights and ex- 
periences regarding spiritual formation. Also, the Formation Coun- 
cil agrees upon common policies in matters which affect the religious 
well-being of the student body as a whole, and makes suitable recom- 
mendations to the administration. To foster the spiritual develop- 
ment of the students, the Formation Council arranges for speakers, 
conferences and workshops. It meets every two weeks. 



21 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 




ADMISSION 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

CHICAGO CLUSTER OF 
THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 



ADMISSION 



PRE-THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

Pre-theological studies are the subject of much discussion and re- 
vision at the present time. Current Roman Catholic thought on this 
subject is spelled out by the American Bishops in their 1971 Program 
of Priestly Formation, #289-320. This document urges that prospec- 
tive priests receive a liberal arts college education in which five 
broad areas of learning are integrated: 

(1) The Study of Man 

(2) The Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

(3) Philosophy 

(4) Religious and Theological Studies 

(5) The Skills of Thought and Learning, Creativity and Com- 
munications 

The central study in such a humanistic education is that of man him- 
self in the context of world history and world culture. Philosophy 
still remains a highly recommended choice of area of concentration 
for the student, but the Bishops' statement also recognizes the value 
of psychology, the social sciences, and the communications arts as 
fields of concentration. 

The Statement on Pre-Seminary Studies of the American Associa- 
tion of Theological Schools furnishes similar guidelines for the larger 
Christian theological community. Rather than prescribe one norma- 
tive pattern for pre-theological studies, the statement suggests an 
approach to program design which will provide the student with 
some in-depth understanding and competence in several of the fol- 
lowing categories of learning: 

(1) Secular Understandings 

(a) of human selfhood and existence 

(b) of modern social institutions and problems 

(c) of cultural religion 

(d) of the modes and processes of understanding 

(2) Theological Understandings 

(a) bible: content and interpretation 

(b) history of Christianity 

(c) constructive theological methodology and interpretation 

(3) Linguistic Skills 

(a) Greek, Hebrew, Latin; 

German, French, or Spanish 



24 



Catholic Theological Union has adapted its admission require- 
ments and recommendations to the spirit of these statements. 



ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS 

All applicants must have a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent 
from an approved college or university. Applicants are also required 
to meet the following course requirements: 

(1) 15 semester hours of philosophy which should include an 
adequate exposure to the major historical periods of philo- 
sophical thought. Other recommended areas of philosophy 
are epistemology, metaphysics and the philosophy of man. 

(2) An introductory course in sociology. 

(3) Two courses in psychology. Experimental psychology and 
the psychology of personality are highly recommended. 

Applicants who have not fulfilled these course requirements may 
be admitted to CTU on probation and will be expected to complete 
them as soon as possible during their first year of residence. 



RECOMMENDED COLLEGE COURSES FOR CTU PROGRAM 

The following are suggestions for courses that would enable en- 
tering students to participate more fully in the CTU program. They 
are not pre-requisite for admission. 

(1) Courses in philosophy (in addition to those recommended 
above) . Courses in philosophy of ethics and linguistic analy- 
sis would prove of special value. 

(2) Reading knowledge of French, German and Latin. 

(3) Courses in psychology. Especially recommended are history 
of psychoanalysis, psychological methodology, depth psy- 
chology and social psychology. 

(4) Cultural anthropology. 

(5) A familiarity with modern theatre and Anglo-American 
literature. 

(6) Survey courses in recent world history, political sciences and 
American history. 

(7) Courses in Old and New Testament. 

(8) An elementary knowledge of Hebrew and Biblical Greek. 



25 



APPLYING FOR ADMISSION 

The general admission procedures are: 

(1) Request official application form from the CTU registrar 
and return completed form with matriculation fee to the 
registrar's office. All applications must be received by May 
15th. Applications will be accepted after this date, but there 
is no guarantee admission processing will be completed be- 
fore the beginning of the Fall Quarter. In such a case a 
student may be admitted conditionally at the discretion of 
the Committee on Admissions. 

(2) Submit transcripts of all college credits to CTU registrar. 

(3) Have scores from Graduate Record Exam sent to CTU regis- 
trar. 

(4) Students applying for admission who do not belong to reli- 
gious congregations officially connected with CTU will also 
have to provide three letters of recommendation. If the per- 
son belongs to a diocese or religious congregation, one of 
these letters must be written by an official representative of 
the diocese or congregation. A personal interview with an 
admissions officer may be required of the prospective student. 

(5) CTU as such does not engage in psychological testing of its 
students. It considers such testing to be the competence of 
the respective religious congregations. Students not con- 
nected with official CTU religious congregations may be re- 
quired to furnish test results to the Dean of Students. CTU 
does not keep such files for other students. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 



REGISTRATION FOR COURSES 

Registration takes place several weeks in advance of the quarter 
in which the courses are to be taken, as announced in the calendar. 

Changes in registration are allowed through the first week of the 
quarter. After that the course must appear in the transcript with 
some grade (cf. below, "grading"). 



26 



CLASS LOAD AND CLASS SCHEDULING 

All courses are three quarter-hour courses, that is, they meet 150 
minutes per week for ten weeks. The eleventh week in very quarter 
is examination week. 

The normal class load is 4 courses (12 quarter hours). Special 
permission is required from the Dean of Studies to carry more than 
12 hours. A full time student is one who carries at least two courses. 

Classes are scheduled Monday through Friday generally in the 
morning and afternoon. Some evening classes are offered. 

GRADING 

Both the letter grade system and the pass-fail system are used at 

CTU. Further details of these options are found in the faculty and 
student handbooks. 

A=Excellent P=Pass 

B=Good HP=High Pass 

C=Fair or Average WP=Withdrew, Passing 

D=Poor WF=Withdrew, Failing 

F=Fail PI=Permanent Incomplete 

WITHDRAWALS 

Students may withdraw from any course up to the end of the 
seventh week of the quarter. Approval of their advisor is required. 
They must follow the procedures established by the Registrar's Office. 

INCOMPLETES 

It is the prerogative of every teacher to allow a student an exten- 
sion of his course work for any given quarter up to the end of the 
fifth week of the next quarter. If the student does not finish his work 
by the end of the fifth week of the following quarter, the teacher has 
two options in grading: "F" (failure) or "PI" (permanent incom- 
plete, i.e., work is no longer subject to completion.) The student may 
take that course again; however, he must register again, pay tuition 
again, etc., as for any other course. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

No college course may be substituted for an upper division course 
at CTU. Graduate credits previously earned in theology may be 
transferred toward the Master of Divinity degree on the condition 
that the student successfully completes one year of academic work 
at CTU. 



27 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



THE CURRICULUM 

In keeping with the stated purpose and objectives of the Catholic 
Theological Union (see p. 8), the curriculum is intended to provide 
the necessary professional preparation for those who wish to enter 
ordained ministry in the Roman Catholic Church and an appropriate 
graduate theological preparation for those who are interested in a 
variety of Christian ministries. Curriculum objectives are specified in 
each of the school's programs. 

Accordingly, the basic curriculum at CTU is structured around the 
first professional degree of Master of Divinity (M.Div.). The 
school also offers the academic degree of Master of Arts in Theology 
(M.A.) to those students who wish to qualify for it. These degree 
programs are not mutually exclusive. A number of cooperative pro- 
grams are also available to CTU students: a cooperative program 
with DePaul University leading to a Master of Arts in Theology 
(M.A.); a program in Mission Studies; and a program of Pastoral 
Teacher Education. 

The course-model is the basic approach used for the theological 
content dimension of the curriculum. However, individual teachers 
are free to experiment with a variety of pedagogical methods and 
the major portion of the required curriculum is by area rather than 
by specific course. 

CTU envisions its programs of preparation for ministry in two 
distinct phases: (l) the First Year Program; and (2) graduate 
professional preparation. 

FIRST YEAR PROGRAM (FYP) 

Purpose and Goals 

The First Year Program is a blend of formal theological study 
and guided ministerial experience which orientates the beginning 
student toward the professional goal of CTU. While the program 
is structured to facilitate entrance into the M.Div. program, it is 
easily adaptable to the needs of those who will enter the M.A. 
Program. 

The goals of the FYP embrace three broad areas in which the 
student being introduced to professional education needs to achive 
a foundational understanding. First, he is to learn that the con- 
temporary world is the context and a basic source of theology. 



28 



Theology arises from the experience of ministering to the world and 
reflecting on this experience, as well as from the written sources. 
The student must learn that openness and dialogue are important for 
doing theology. Second, as he assumes limited ministerial respon- 
sibility, the student must learn to confront his own ministerial voca- 
tion and to set personal goals. As he reflects on his experience in 
ministering, he comes to understand that his theological study con- 
tributes substantively to his capacity for ministry. Third, the student 
must realize that Christian ministry demands continual personal 
growth. The quality of his theology and ministry is conditioned by 
his holiness and wholeness. Successful ministry demands a rich 
humanness and the ability to develop and sustain inter-personal re- 
lationships. 

Small group reflective sessions directed by skilled facilitators are 
available for first year students who wish to make use of this service 
to further the personal growth goals of the FYP. 

The FYP is under the direction of an inter-departmental team 
of coordinators. The program, which was introduced in 1970, has 
been continually evaluated and modified. Greater flexibility and 
more direct ministerial experience have been incorporated into the 
FYP for 1972-73. 



Structure and Content 

The theological dimension of the FYP includes course work in 
the areas of biblical, historical and systematic studies, which serves 
to introduce the student to the scriptures and to systematic theologi- 
cal reflection on the Christian heritage. The ministerial experience is 
provided by a pastoral work program which serves both as an intro- 
duction to ministry and as the experiential base for theological study. 
To ensure proper integration of these components, faculty members 
work with the students in the pastoral work program as theological 
reflectors. Thus the basic issues of theology and ministry are re- 
flected upon as complementary and inter-acting. 

During orientation the student and his academic adviser work 
out the optional course sequences of his program in view of his 
background and needs and the goals of the FYP. Six to eight 
students are grouped into a team for the pastoral work program. 
Each team is headed by a theological reflector. Team placement is 
made by the FYP coordinators after questionnaires and personal in- 
terview. The student's program is then approved by the FYP co- 
ordinating team and the Dean of Studies. 



29 



The full FYP consists of 36 quarter hours of work. Previous work 
may be accepted as equivalent to all or part of the FYP. 

The FYP Curriculum 
Fall Quarter: 

OLD TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION 
THE EARLY EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY 
INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION 
INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY 
PASTORAL WORK PROGRAM 

Winter Quarter: 

NEW TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION 

THE CHRISTIANIZATION OF EUROPE 

CHRISTIAN THEISM AND SECULAR HUMANISM 

THE DYNAMICS OF CHRISTIAN CONSCIENCE FORMATION 

PASTORAL WORK PROGRAM 

Spring Quarter: 

THE BIBLE: ITS FORMATION AND INTERPRETATION 
CHRISTIANITY IN THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 
REVELATION AND SALVATION WITHIN SPECIAL AND GENERAL 

ECONOMIES OF SALVATION 
THEOLOGY OF THE CHURCH 
PASTORAL WORK PROGRAM 

Courses in biblical, classical, and modern languages, are also avail- 
able during various quarters of the year. 



MASTER OF DIVINITY (M.DIV.) PROGRAM 

Purpose and Goals 

The Master of Divinity is the first professional degree and the 
focus of CTU's academic program. The primary aim of the M.Div. 
Program is to prepare students to be effective ministers as described 
in the CTU statement of purpose and objectives (see p. 8). Build- 
ing on the First Year Program, the M.Div. Program combines an 
academic core of theological studies with a theoretical and practical 



30 



study of the professional skills needed by the Roman Catholic priest. 

Consensus on three basic dimensions or elements of a sound pro- 
fessional education for ministry emerged at CTU in the course of a 
long and serious study of the curriculum. 

1 . Theological Content. The student must achieve a thorough and 
critical understanding of the Christian heritage. He must develop 
the ability to interpret and apply it creatively within the context of 
present-day thought and culture. It has been the task of the several 
departments to single out those areas which the student should en- 
counter and for which he will be held responsible. These areas are 
outlined below. 

2. Ministerial Skills. The student must acquire a set of skills ap- 
propriate for his future ministry. This process includes a number of 
inter-locking phases in which the student masters theory and tech- 
niques, engages in actual ministerial experience in a developing way 
under the guidance of a supervisor, and assumes increasing respon- 
sibility for perfecting his own professional skills. The skills to be 
acquired include not only the traditional ones, such as preaching, pas- 
toral counseling, administration of the sacraments, appropriate litur- 
gical style, but also those called for in the relatively new possibili- 
ties for mission and ministry. 

3. Integrative Education. The third dimension of professional 
preparation for ministry at CTU is the difficult task of integration. 
The student is aided in this effort by such facets of the program as 
the interdisciplinary character of the FYP, the increasing number 
of team and inter-departmental courses, the comprehensive project 
or seminar required for the M.Div. degree, and especially the pro- 
gram of Field Education. 



Field Education 

It is the task of Field Education to bring the student's growing 
mastery of theological content and acquisition of ministerial skills 
into focus and personal integration in the act of effective ministry. 
Theory and skills of themselves do little for the minister unless in 
their acquisition they are integrated in such a way that they become 
part of the process of human growth. This presumes that the great- 
est resource of the ministry is a well integrated or developed per- 
sonhood. 



31 



The Director of Field Education at the Catholic Theological 
Union is responsible for placing individual students in specific and 
expertly supervised action programs. The Department of Christian 
Mission and Ministry is responsible for providing opportunities for 
theological reflection growing out of such programs. A variety of 
possibilities for field education exist in the local community (Hyde 
Park-Kenwood area) and the larger Chicago metropolis, e.g., 
parishes, chaplaincies in the hospitals, correctional institutions, jails; 
the inner-city apostolate; radio and television communications; cate- 
chetical and youth counseling programs; various social action pro- 
grams; campus ministry. 

Each student enrolled in the Master of Divinity Program will be 
required to spend eighteen quarter hours or the equivalent of two 
quarters in supervised field education programs. Students are en- 
couraged to enroll in a Clinical Pastoral Education program for one 
of the quarters. 

Pre-requisites 

Candidates for the Master of Divinity must meet the general ad- 
mission requirements of the Catholic Theological Union. They must 
also have completed the CTU First Year Program or its equivalent. 

First year students who plan to enter the M.Div. Program are 
required to take a total of 36 quarter hours chosen from the first 
year offerings. Of these, three courses (9 hours) are required in 
the Department of Biblical Literature and Languages: BLL 300, 
305, 315, and two quarters (Fall and Winter) of the pastoral work 
program are mandatory. 

Once the pre-requisites have been met, the M.Div. Program will 
usually take three years (at least 8 quarters). 

Language Requirements 

Language requirements are determined by each department for its 
course offerings. 

Course Requirements 

A total of 99 quarter hours of graduate level work are required 
for the Master of Divinity. Three of these hours represent the com- 



32 



prehensive requirement. The remaining hours are divided among 
the following required areas: 



A. Dept. of Biblical Literature & Languages (BLL) 18 hrs. 
Area Requirements: 

1. Old Testament 9 hrs. 

Three areas: 

Pentateuch or Deuteronomic Corpus 
Prophets 

Wisdom Literature or Psalms 

2. New Testament 9 hrs. 

Three areas: 

Synoptics 

Johannine Literature 
Pauline Literature 

B. Dept. of Historical & Doctrinal Studies (HDS) 33 hrs. 
Area Requirements: 

1. History 3 hrs. 

Course in Modern or Contemporary History 

2. Systematics 30 hrs. 

a. Doctrine 18 hrs. 

God 

Creation & Eschatology 

Christ 

Church 

Sacraments (two courses, one of which 
must be on Eucharist) 

b. Ethics 9 hrs 

One course in systematic ethics 

Two courses in ethical issues 

c. Law 3 hrs. 

Theology of Law 

C. Dept. of Christian Mission & Ministry ( CMM ) 30 hrs. 
Area Requirements: 

1. Sacramental Law 3 hrs. 

2. Pastoral Counseling 3 hrs. 

3. Preaching 3 hrs. 

4. Mission 3 hrs. 

5. Field Education 18 hrs. 

D. Elective s 15 hrs. 

TOTAL 96 hrs. 



33 



Com prehensive Requirement 

The candidate for the Master of Divinity degree must also give 
evidence of his ability to integrate his total educational experience 
into an operational totality. This is done in either of two ways. 

(1) A master's report or project demonstrating both integration 
of theological knowledge and a creative response to some 
particular problem of ministry. 

(2) An inter-departmental integrating seminar. The object of 
this seminar is not the imparting of new knowledge, but 
rather the integration of knowledge and skills already ac- 
quired and their application to concrete problems of ministry. 
The student is evaluated on his ability to apply the totality of 
his professional education to the areas treated in the seminar. 
The seminar (M.Div. 598) is directed by an inter-depart- 
mental team and will be offered in the Winter and Spring 
Quarters. 

Each of the above is equivalent to three quarter hours and stu- 
dents will be charged the normal fee for one course. 

MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) — CTU PROGRAM 

The purpose of the CTU Program for the Master of Arts in The- 
ology is multidimensional. The Program is designed, within the 
resources of CTU and the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, 
to provide the theological background for those who wish: to pre- 
pare for entrance into a doctrinal program in theology; to teach re- 
ligion at a secondary or college level; to develop a basic competence 
in the area of theological studies though their principal specializa- 
tion lies elsewhere. 

The M.A. Program is marked by flexibility, allowing for a wide 
variety of individually tailored programs. When he applies for ad- 
mission to the Program, normally by the middle of the quarter pre- 
ceding admission, the candidate will choose the objectives (s) which 
best meet his needs. Before registering for M.A. course work he will 
meet with his M.A. Board to work out the details of a program de- 
signed to help him achieve the objective(s) he has chosen. The M.A. 
Board will meet with the student once each quarter to evaluate his 
progress and to make any modifications in the program which might 
be advisable. 



34 



c 



The M.A. in theology is not routinely granted en route to the 
M.Div. It is also open to those who wish to gain theological back- 
ground for work other than the priestly ministry. 

Once the pre-requisites have been met, the M.A. Program will 
usually take two years (one year of course work plus the time needed 
for the thesis and the comprehensive examinations) . It must be com- 
pleted within seven years. 

Prerequisites 

Candidates for the M.A. in Theology must meet the general ad- 
mission requirements of Catholic Theological Union. They must 
also have completed one year (24 semester hours or 36 quarter 
hours) of university or seminary level theology. This latter require- 
ment can be fulfilled in the CTU First Year Program or by an under- 
graduate major in Theology or Religious Studies from an accredited 
college or university, provided that the faculty judges this to be 
equivalent. 

Language Requirements 

A reading knowledge of one modern foreign language is required 
of all candidates for the M.A. degree. The choice will normally 
be limited to French or German. In addition, those specializing in 
HDS will normally be required to demonstrate a reading knowledge 
of Latin, and those specializing in BLL will be required to demon- 
strate a reading knowledge of Greek or Hebrew, or both, depending 
on the scope of the program. Language requirements shall normally 
be met by the end of the first quarter of the first year of the M.A. 
Program. 

Course Requirements 

Requirements include 36 quarter hours (12 courses) of course 
work, in which the candidate must maintain a "B" average. The 
course work shall be divided as follows: 

1. Eight upper division courses in the student's area 
of specialization (BLL, HDS, or selected areas 

of which two courses are advanced seminars) . . 24 hours 

2. Two upper division courses in each of the other 

areas 12 hours 



35 



Up to one third of the courses may be taken in other schools of 
the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools. By special arrangement 
with the M.A. Board, this may be increased to one half. 

Thesis 

As part of the requirement for the M.A. in Theology, the candi- 
date must demonstrate the ability to do competent work in his field 
by writing a thesis characterized by research and independent 
thought. This thesis shall be seventy-five to one hundred pages in 
length and conform to one of the accepted manuals of style for 
this kind of work. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

The final requirement for the M.A. in Theology is a two-part 
comprehensive examination in which the candidate is to demonstrate 
his grasp of theological methodologies used in theological disciplines 
and the scope and integration of his theological studies. The con- 
tent and approach for which he will be responsible in the compre- 
hensives is determined by the student and his Board of Examiners 
within the general prescriptions of the M.A. Program. 

Further details of the M.A. Program can be obtained from the 
Director, Fr. Roman Vanasse, O.Praem. 



MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.)— COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 
AT DE PAUL 

A Master of Arts Program has been worked out cooperatively be- 
tween The Catholic Theological Union and De Paul University, the 
degree being granted by De Paul University. In general the Graduate 
Program offered by the Department of Theology of De Paul Uni- 
versity requires: 

l) Completion of forty-eight quarter hours of graduate study, of 
which up to eight quarter hours may be applied to the thesis. 

a) Eight graduate hours (two courses) must be taken in the area 
of Scripture; four quarter hours (one course )in doctrinal 
history of systematic theology; four quarter hours (one 
course) in religious ethics. 



36 



b) In the allied field the student must take two of the following 
courses: Sociology 302 (Cultural Anthropology), Philos- 
ophy 365 (Philosophy of Religion), Theology 343 (Social 
Dimension of Religion) or Theology 440 (Religious Com- 
munciation). He must also choose a seminar in the philos- 
ophy department on some philosophy pertinent to religious 
thought. 

c) Thesis: Students will register for Theology 499 (Thesis Re- 
search) for eight quarter hours credit. 

2) One foreign language. Evidence of the candidate's reading 
knowledge of theological literature in German, French, Latin, 
Greek, Hebrew, or with special permission, any other language in 
which thesis research will be conducted. 

3) A two-part written comprehensive examination in the field of 
biblical studies, doctrinal history, systematic theology and reli- 
gious ethics, each part taken for three hours. 

4) A one hour oral "defense of the thesis". 

DIRECTIVES FOR CTU STUDENTS IN THE DE PAUL M.A. PROGRAM: 

1) Prerequisites 

a) CTU students who wish to enroll at De Paul for the M.A. 
in Theology must have completed the prerequisite courses, 
that is, the First Year Program at CTU. 

b) Each student who wishes to enroll in the graduate program 
at De Paul must present a letter of recommendation to the 
Dean of CTU from the academic supervisor of his particular 
religious community or diocese. 

2) Requirements for the M.A. in Theology 

a) CTU students registered for the M.A. at De Paul are re- 
quired to take five courses (20 quarter hours) at De Paul; 
the other twenty quarter hours must be taken at CTU. 

b) The Master's Thesis (eight quarter hours) may be written 
under the direction of a faculty member from either De Paul 
or CTU. The student, however, must register for Theology 



37 



499 at De Paul and follow the norms for thesis direction 
issued by the Department of Theology at De Paul. 

c) CTU students must follow the area and course requirements, 
language requirements, etc., as determined by the Graduate 
School of De Paul University. 



PROGRAM IN MISSION STUDIES 

The Program of Mission Studies, which is being developed at 
Catholic Theological Union in collaboration with the Chicago Cluster 
of Theological Schools, aims to provide part of the academic prepara- 
tion and personal orientation that is necessary or useful for a person 
who is to share in the missionary work of the Church or is interested 
in this work. 

Under the direction of Father John Boberg, S.V.D., with the help 
of other Divine Word Missionaries and the enthusiastic and expert* 
cooperation of Prof. James Scherer (LSTC) and Father John Hardon, 
SJ. (BST), the program began in the school year 1970-1971 with a 
number of course offerings. A more comprehensive and balanced 
program has evolved over the years, so that beginning in the 1972- 
1973 school year students can earn the M.A. in Theology with a 
Specialization in Mission. Plans include the offering of a special 
diploma or degree program open to anyone interested in mission 
studies. 

Four main areas or dimensions are covered by the program: the 
theological, the soeio-cultural, the religious, and the international. 

1. Theological Dimension. Integrated into the overall curriculum 
of CTU and CCTS, the Mission Studies Program shares in the rich 
ecumenical offerings of theological courses of the schools. The theo- 
logical dimension of the program, therefore, aims to provide special- 
ized courses that develop the deeper and broader implications of 
theology for the understanding and implementation of the specific 
missionary activity of the Church. 

2. Socio-Cultural Dimension. The missionary activity of the 
Church generally still means cross-cultural contact. This part of the 
program aims to provide the theory and the skills necessary for such 

38 



work. In addition to specific courses in anthropology and sociology, 
an interdisciplinary approach is taken to such questions as community 
development. A specialized cross-cultural field experience will also 
be a part of the program. The purpose of this experience would be 
to ascertain and develop the cultural adaptability of the student and 
lead him to further reflection on theology against the background of 
this experience. 

3. Religious Dimension. The new vitality of non-Christian reli- 
gions demands an understanding on the part of the missionary of the 
religious phenomenon as such, as well as the rich variety of ways 
in which the basic religious experience has been concretized by men 
of all times and places. This would include general courses like 
the Philosophy of Religion or the Phenomenology of Religion, and, 
as the program develops and need arises, courses in specific religions. 
The neighboring rich resources of the University of Chicago are sig- 
nificant for this aspect of the program. 

4. International Dimension. The missionary going overseas must 
see himself as something more than a plug filling up a hole or a poor 
substitute for a local minister. He must bring to the local Church a 
knowledge of the problem and a development that transcends 
any particular culture. He must sense the larger needs and implica- 
tions of international attempts to solve problems. The program will 
thus provide both an atmosphere of international involvement as well 
as courses like the Church and the Third World, World Poverty, 
Development and Liberation, Theology of Revolution. 

In addition to the courses offered, the Program of Mission Studies 
plans to regularly sponsor broader projects in missionary education. 
A symposium on specific aspects of the world mission of the Church 
is offered in the Fall. In the Spring a week-long institute is spon- 
sored for missionaries on furlough. 

For the 1972-1973 school year Bellarmine School of Theology 
(BST), the Catholic Theological Union (CTU) and the Lutheran 
School of Theology (LSTC) have highlighted the following courses 
offerings in the Mission Programs: 

Fall Quarter: 

EARLY EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY: L. NEMER (CTU) 
THEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON MISSION: J. BOBERG (CTU) 
DEVELOPMENT OF CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY: J. BOBERG (CTU) 



39 



ETHICS AND INTERNATIONAL RESPONSIBILITY: J. PAWLIKOWSKI 
(CTU) 

INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY OF RELIGIONS: J. HARDON (BST) 
THEOLOGY OF NON-CHRISTIAN RELIGIONS: J. HARDON (BST) 
STUDIES IN MISSION: S. HUTAGALUNG (LSTC) 

Winter Quarter: 

christianization of europe: l. nemer (ctu) 
19th century imperialism and world mission: l. nemer (ctu) 
christianity in world history: j. boberg (ctu) 
missionary catechetics: j. boberg (ctu) 
major issues in lutheran ecumenical dialogues: e. arden 
(lstc) 

culture and christian communication in crisis: d. flatt/ 

r. kaeske (lstc) 
christianity in africa: j. may (nbts) 

Spring Quarter: 

REVELATION AND SALVATION WITHIN SPECIAL AND GENERAL 

ECONOMICS OF SALVATION: P. KNITTER (CTU) 
THEOLOGY OF MISSION: J. HARDON (BST) 
MARXISM AND CHRISTIANITY: J. HARDON (BST) 
CONTEMPORARY MISSION PROBLEMS II: J. BOBERG (CTU) 
READINGS IN AREA STUDIES: J. BOBERG (CTU) 

CULTURAL anthropology: H. loiskandl (ctu) 
some religious possibilities in a secular age: d. lindberg 
(lstc) 

the ecumenical movement: d. durnbaugh (beth) 



PASTORAL TEACHER EDUCATION 

The Center for Studies in Religious Education, located in Hyde 
Park, sponsors a supervised program in Pastoral Teacher Education 
analogous to Clinical Pastoral Education. 

P.T.E. involves the student-teacher for thirty to forty hours a 
week for one quarter. By expert supervision, reflective sessions, per- 
sonal and professional counseling, and peer interaction, it helps the 
student to maximize his potential for the effective teaching of reli- 
gion. It thus provides for a closer practical bond between theology 
and educational practice in the ministry. 

40 



The program offers academic credit. Interested students should 
contact the Director of Field Education. 



CHICAGO CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

The Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools is an ecumenical as- 
sociation of eight Protestant and Catholic seminaries, whose purpose 
is to promote quality theological education in preparing ministers 
and priests to serve the contemporary Church through a programmed 
sharing of resources. 

The participating schools maintain educational autonomy and con- 
tinue to offer their own degrees, both professional and academic. 
Each school also preserves its confessional identity and theological 
traditions. 

The idea of the Cluster goes back to January, 1969, when the 
Lutheran School of Theology, the Catholic Theological Union, and 
the Chicago Theological Seminary agreed to open all courses to the 
students of the three schools without additional fees. Five additional 
schools subsequently joined in the collaborative planning which 
eventuated in the formation of the Chicago Cluster of Theological 
Schools on May 4, 1970. The Cluster was incorporated under the 
laws of the State of Illinois on April 26, 1971. 

Five schools are located in Hyde Park: Bellarmine School of 
Theology, Catholic Theological Union, Chicago Theological Semi- 
nary, Lutheran School of Theology, and Meadville/Lombard Theo- 
logical School. Three schools are in the western suburbs: Bethany 
and Northern Baptist in Oak Brook, and DeAndreis in Lemont. 

The Cluster enriches the theological potential of the member 
schools in many ways: 

1) A student enrolled in any Cluster school may take courses in 
any other Cluster school without additional tuition or regis- 
tration fees. During the 1972 school year, students cross- 
registered for over 500 courses. 

2) The Cluster sponsors courses team- taught by professors of 
two or more schools. 



41 



3) Cluster- wide sponsorship of study programs and course se- 
quences which would not be possible for a single school to 
produce, such as special programs in theology and science, 
and overseas missions. 

4) Cluster- wide sponsorship of special consultations and work- 
shop, such as on dying and death, prayer and spirituality, wom- 
en's liberation, parochial ministry. 

5) Reciprocal library privileges and services to all Cluster stu- 
dents and faculty. 

6) Joint planning in purchasing, use of educational facilities, 
faculty replacement. 

The Cluster schools are now studying a proposal of the Long- 
Range Planning Committee by which several functional specialties 
would be administered and staffed by Cluster committees drawn 
from all participating schools. 

The Cluster is directed by a full-time coordinator, with staff as- 
sistants for academics and library. 

The Chicago Cluster is a prime example of ecumenical under- 
standing and cooperation. A large area of theological studies is of 
common interest and is confessionally not sensitive. In many courses, 
professors of all denominations use the same basic sources and 
methodology. In addition, there are questions of current interest to 
all confessions, and the contributions of modern theologians often 
cut across confessional lines. Cluster experience has shown that stu- 
dents become more appreciative of their own confessional identity 
and professors do not proselytize in any way. 



42 



COURSES OF STUDY 




BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES 
HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES 
CHRISTIAN MISSION AND MINISTRY 



COURSES OF STUDY 



Courses offered during the academic year 1972-73 are listed below. 
Three departments make up the school of theology of the Catholic 
Theological Union : The Department of Biblical Literature and Lan- 
guages; the Department of Historical and Doctrinal Studies; and 
the Department of Christian Mission and Ministry. The courses are 
divided into three series: "300" series (courses prerequisite to grad- 
uate work at either the M.A. or M.Div. level) ; "400" series (grad- 
uate level courses representing generally the core courses for the 
M.Div. degree); "500" series (graduate level seminars developing 
special questions in biblical, traditional and contemporary theology). 

All courses are three quarter-hour courses, that is, classes are 
scheduled 150 minutes per week for ten weeks. The eleventh week 
is evaluation week. 



A. DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES. 
(BLL) 

Staff: Geron Fournelle (Chairman), Robert Karris, Callistus Langerholz, 
Hayim G. Perelmuter, Donald Senior, Alphonse Spilly, Carroll Stuhl- 
mueller. 

BLL 300: OLD TESTAMENT: INTRODUCTION 

Select passages from the books and major traditions of the entire Old 
Testament will be studied against the background of Israel's history, 
religion and literary genres. The primary goal of this course is a con- 
trolled knowledge of the Old Testament in preparation for future in- 
depth study of individual sections. Yearly. STUHLMUELLER (Sec .1) 

SPILLY (Sec. 2) 
(Fall) 

BLL 305: NEW TESTAMENT : INTRODUCTION 

The writings of the New Testament will be presented in their historical, 
cultural, religious and sociological context in the Greco-Roman world. 
Introduction to the methodological tools employed in New Testament 
research and to the diverse theologies that comprise the New Testament 
witness to Jesus of Nazareth. (Section 1 is limited to students who have 
some knowledge of Greek.) Yearly. KARRIS (Sec. 1) 

SENIOR (Sec. 2) 
(Winter) 



44 



BLL 315: THE BIBLE: ITS FORMATION AND 
INTERPRETATION 

The formation of the Bible in terms of the "word" and its revelation 
of God's presence as Savior within the community of faith. The emer- 
gence of a sacred tradition of holy writ, interpreted anew by and for 
each generation. Topics of special study include: biblical inspiration 
and inerrancy; revelation, scripture and tradition; liturgy and the scrip- 
tures; the senses of scripture; Canon; texts and versions; textual criti- 
cism. Yearly. FOURNELLE and SENIOR 

(Spring) 

BLL 320: BIBLICAL GREEK 

This course is designed to meet the needs of students who have little 
or no knowledge of Biblical Greek. SENIOR 

(Fall) 

BLL 325: INTRODUCTORY HEBREW 

An introductory course for those who have not previously studied 
Hebrew. Yearly. , FOURNELLE 

(Winter) 

N.B. Advanced courses in the biblical languages will be offered by the 
department according to the needs of the students. 



BLL 400: HISTORICAL EXEGETICAL STUDY OF THE 
PENTATEUCH 

Historical background of the Old Testament milieu. Hebrew position in 
the world picture. Exegesis of Genesis 1-11. Patriarchal narratives. 
Exodus event as central to the understanding of the O.T. 1973-1974. 

FOURNELLE 

BLL 405: THE DEUTERONOMIC HISTORY 

Deuteronomy and the deuteronomic history. From the "conquest" to 
the end of the kingdoms, stressing the deuteronomic theology of history 
in the major events of the period. FOURNELLE 

(Fall) 

BLL 410: PRE-EXILIC PROPHECY 

The origin of the "classical" or "writing" Prophets in the unique genius 
of Mosaic Religion and in the early prophetic guilds. An exegesis of 
key- passages in Amos, Hosea, and particularly Jeremiah, to appreciate 
their particular reaction to the religious contribution to the prophetic 
movement. DeVAULT 

(Spring) 



45 



BLL 415: EVOLVING FORM OF PROPHETISM DURING THE 
EXILE AND POST-EXILIC PERIODS 

The salient role of Ezekiel and Deutero-Isaiah during the pivotal period 
of the exile. Later subservience of the prophetic movement to priestly 
legalism or to the apocalyptic form of postexilic Judaism. The study will 
be undertaken by means of key texts within the prophets. 

STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 420: THE PSALMS 

The psalms investigated against the background of biblical religion and 
other ancient Near Eastern religions. Various literary types. The psalms 
as representative of major religious movements in Israel. 

STUHLMUELLER 
(Fall) 

BLL 425: OLD TESTAMENT WISDOM LITERATURE 

The wisdom movement in Israel and the ancient Near East. Problems of 
the "wise men." Retribution considered as thematic to study. 1973-1974. 

FOURNELLE 

BLL 430: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW 

Within the structure and the purpose of the Gospel, Matthew will be 
studied as a Pastor in his community in applying Jesus' teaching to his 
own situation. LANGERHOLZ 

(Winter) 

BLL 432: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MARK 

Introduction to Gospel form — and redaction — criticism. Exegesis of the 
Gospel. Mark's place in the theology of the primitive community. 

SENIOR 
(Spring) 

BLL 435: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO LUKE 

Introduction to form and redaction criticism. Exegesis of the entire gos- 
pel with special reference to the most recent and the most significant 
redaction critical studies. Luke's place in the theologies of the Early 
Church. 1973-1974. KARRIS 

BLL 440: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO JOHN 

A critical-exegetical approach to John's text to arrive at his sources and 
to evaluate his theology, particularly on the mission of the Son and 
the Church. Yearly. LANGERHOLZ 

(Fall) 



46 



BLL 450: PAULINE THEOLOGY 



Origin and development of main Pauline themes in the light of Paul's 
experience as well as the theological and cultural traditions and theo- 
logical disputes of his time. Implications for ministry. SPILLY 

(Spring) 

BLL 455: PAULINE EXEGESIS 

Methodology used in the exegesis of a Pauline epistle. Paul's theological 
and cultural milieu. Detailed exegesis of the entire epistle. The epistles 
treated differ from year to year. Offered 1972-1973. 

Colossians and Ephesians KARRIS 

(Fall) 

Corinthians SPILLY 

(Winter) 

BLL 460: THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES 

The distinctive theology of this second part of Luke-Acts will be in- 
vestigated by the study of the methods of historical writing in antiquity, 
by the study of the speeches, and by the exegesis of other key passages. 
The question of using Acts as a source for the life and theology of Paul 
will also be discussed. KARRIS 

(Spring) 

BLL 500: SEMITIC THOUGHT AND CULTURE 

Directed research and class discussion, centering on such elements of 
Israelite daily life as: Hebrew language and psychology; social life of 
the people; commerce and industry; labor and sports; natural topog- 
raphy; climate and rainfall; etc. Extended lectures on the Hebrew lan- 
guage are directed towards those students who do not intend a formal 
study of the language. 1973-1974. STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 502: PROBLEM OF AN O.T. THEOLOGY 

The question to be discussed is the possibility of a "theology" of the 
O.T. as differentiated from a "history of religious thought" in the O.T. 
Views of Burrows, Eichrodt, von Rad, de Vaux, Vriezen, Wright, etc., 
to be considered. FOURNELLE 

(Winter) 

BLL 508: BIBLICAL THEOLOGY OF CREATION AND CHAOS 

Creation texts will be studied as indicators of the mystery of salvation, 
in which divine goals clash with human weakness and sinfulness, in- 
cluding chaos, yet leading to a new creation. The course will include 
eschatology and apocalyptic. 1973-1974. STUHLMUELLER 



47 



BLL 518: INTERTESTAMENTAL LITERATURE 



Historico-cultural-religious developments of the period. Jewish apocalyp- 
tic and its influence on the religious thought of the Jews. Implications 
for New Testament study. Study of selected themes. FOURNELLE 

(Spring) 

BLL 520: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE: I 

The tri-partite course on the Liturgy of the Synagogue — over a two year 
period — surveys worship forms in the contemporary American Syna- 
gogue with special reference to the common thread and variations in 
the Jewish denominations: Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform. This 
first section deals with the weekly synagogue service PERELMUTER 

(Fall) 

BLL 521: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE: II 

The Liturgy of the High Holy Days: Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur. 
(Text: Agnon, Days of Awe [Schocken]). PERELMUTER 

(Spring) 

BLL 524: READINGS IN RABBINIC LITERATURE: I 

An examination of Rabbinic interpretation and variations on themes 
from the book of Genesis. PERELMUTER 

(Fall) 

BLL 525: READINGS IN RABBINIC LITERATURE: II 

Ethics of the Fathers. A careful examination of the texts to give an 
insight into Rabbinic thought and methodology. PERELMUTER 

(Spring) 

BLL 356: RABBINIC JUDAISM AND THE EARLY CHURCH 

An examination of the nature of Rabbinic Judaism out of which Chris- 
tianity emerged and with which Christianity co-existed over the cen- 
turies. An effort at achieving an insight into the approach and the mind 
of Rabbinic Judaism through an examination of the pertinent literature. 

PERELMUTER 
(Fall) 

BLL 531: THE PASSION IN MATTHEW'S GOSPEL 

SENIOR 
(Fall) 



48 



BLL 535: THE RESURRECTION TEXTS IN THE GOSPELS AND 
ST. PAUL 

The biblical background of the theme of resurrection. The hermeneutic 
of the empty tomb and apparitions. LANGERHOLZ 

(Spring) 

BLL 570: THE PHENOMENON OF EARLY CATHOLICISM IN 
THE NEW TESTAMENT 

I and II Peter, James, the Pastorals, Luke- Acts will be investigated from 
the viewpoint of what Ernst Kasemann and others call "Early Catholi- 
cism." The theological tendencies of these New Testament books will 
be analyzed to see whether or to what extent they are "Early Catholic," 
i.e., stress moralization of the faith, hierarchical organization, fides quae 
creditur, etc. The problem of theological diversity in the New Testa- 
ment. KARRIS 

(Winter) 

BLL 572: THE ETHICAL TEACHING OF THE EARLY CHURCH 

How do the words, life, death- and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth 
function ethically in the Early Church? How and why did the Early 
Church borrow its ethical norms from its Jewish and Gentile contempo- 
raries? The Sermon on the Mount. The Epistle of James. Paul. The 
Pastoral Epistles. The Didache. The Shepherd of Hermas. The Apol- 
ogists. The Sentences of Sextus. KARRIS and NORQUIST 

(Spring) 

BLL 575: PROPHECY IN THE EARLY CHURCH 

Directed research and class discussion on the roles and functions of 
prophecy and prophetism in the New Testament and Apostolic Fathers 
against their contemporary Jewish and Hellenistic background. 

SPILLY 
(Winter) 

BLL 590: PRAYER OF THE OLD TESTAMENT 

This seminar will investigate Hebrew prayer exegetically (Staff), as 
understood and utilized rabinically (Perelmuter) , and as seen in pa- 
tristic times (Isabell). STAFF 

(Spring) 



49 



B. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES 
(HDS) 

Staff: Nicholas Crotty, Zachary Hayes (Chairman), Damiel Isabell, Basil 
Johnson, Paul Knitter, Sebastian MacDonald (Sabbatical), Hugh 
McElwain, Lawrence Nemer, Gilbert Ostdiek John Pawlikowski, 
Roman Vanasse. 

HDS 302: THE EARLY EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY 

A study of the Church in its encounter with new cultures and an analy- 
sis of the effects the culture had on the Church (institutions, theology, 
and religious life) and the Church had on Society. Major considerations 
will be: The Jewish Community becoming Greek (early theology and 
heresies), becoming Roman (Church-State issues and institutional de- 
velopment), and becoming Byzantine (Caesaropapism and the Christo- 
logical debates) while at the same time elsewhere becoming something 
new (Barbarian invasions and the Papacy). Yearly. NEMER 

(Fall) 

HDS 307: THE CHRISTIANIZATION OF EUROPE 

A study of the Church's encounter with the Barbarian nations, of their 
conversion, and of the development of Christian life. An analysis of 
how the task affected Church life and thought, and of how the Church 
affected the world. Major consideration will be given to: Medieval 
Missions; Charlemagne; the Papal States; the Schism between East and 
West; and the development and experience of a Christian European 
Culture (theology, philosophy, social and political structures). Yearly. 

NEMER 
(Winter) 

HDS 310: CHRISTIANITY IN THE RENAISSANCE AND 
REFORMATION 

Factors influencing the breakdown of the medieval synthesis. Renais- 
sance thought and style chiefly in relationship to the Church. Writings 
of the Reformers, and the position of Trent. Yearly. NEMER 

(Spring) 

HDS 320: INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION 

The course will first attempt to isolate some of the elements common 
to all religions, and their relationship to social structures. From this 
perspective, the phenomenon of civil religion will be examined, espe- 
cially as it is manifested in recent and contemporary attitudes in Ameri- 
can politics and diplomacy. VANASSE 

(Fall) 



50 



HDS 322: REVELATION AND SALVATION WITHIN SPECIAL 
AND GENERAL ECONOMIES OF SALVATION 

KNITTER 
(Spring) 

HDS 325: INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and methods of theology worked 
out from a study of several case-histories. Special emphasis on the his- 
torical revelation in Christianity and the developing awareness of the 
faith-community in relation to shifting horizons. HAYES 

(Fall) 

HDS 330: CHRISTIAN THEISM AND SECULAR HUMANISM 

The localization of why Christian theistic faith has become problematic 
in our culture. The meaning of Christian theistic faith in biblical and 
Christian history and why it is a response to the contemporary prob- 
lematic about the meaning of human life. KNITTER 

(Winter) 

HDS 345: THEOLOGY OF THE CHURCH 

A study of the origins of the Church; the relation of the Kingdom 
to the Church; the basic images and themes in Scripture and tradition; 
the development of ecclesiastical office; and the relation of the Church 
to the world. Yearly. HAYES 

(Spring) 

HDS 370: THE DYNAMICS OF CHRISTIAN CONSCIENCE 
FORMATION 

Studies the ways in which Christians may view, confront and achieve 
their task of ethical decision-making. Involves reflection on such mat- 
ters as the meaning of conscience, traditional and contemporary ap- 
proaches to ethical judgment and decision, moral development and 
moral education, the question of a specifically Christian morality. Yearly. 

CROTTY 
(Winter) 

HDS 415: CATHOLIC CHURCH IN UPHEAVAL 

An attempt to study historically the crisis in the Church. The student 
will begin with the situation at present and will study the history of 
such problems as social policy changes, communism, the role of the lay- 
man, war, ecumenism, and theological revolution — as all affect the 
Church 1973. (bst: divn 419) ROSS 

(Spring) 



51 



HDS 417: FROM NEWMAN TO VATICAN II 



This course will trace the main ideas and events of Roman Catholicism 
from 1845 to 1965. Special emphasis will be given to the personality 
and theology of John Henry Newman and a comparison and contrast of 
Vatican I and Vatican II. 1973. (bst: divn 422) ROSS 

(Winter) 

HDS 420: CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE 19TH CENTURY 
UNITED STATES 

A study through research, lectures, and discussions of the major trends 
and problems which shaped the American Catholic Church. Special 
emphasis will be placed on "Americanism". 1972. (bst: divn 552) 

MADDEN 
(Fall) 

HDS 422: 19TH CENTURY EUROPE AND WORLD MISSION 

A study of the Church as it encounters the new world born of the French 
Revolution, of how it affects and is affected by social and political con- 
siderations, of imperialism (Church and State), and of the missionary 
expansion in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Major considera- 
tions will be given to: the Church's encounter with French and Italian 
political liberalism, with German philosophical and theological liberal- 
ism, with English scientific and political liberalism; the Church's re- 
sponse in the Syllabus of Errors and Vatican I; Europe in Asia and 
Africa; Mission as Structure; the hesitant growth of local Churches; 
a western Christianity in a non-western world. Yearly. NEMER 

(Winter) 

HDS 430: THE PROBLEM OF GOD 

A detailed study of the meaning of Christian theistic faith in the light 
of the problems raised by contemporary atheism and scientific develop- 
ments. Yearly. HAYES (Sec. 1) 

KNITTER (Sec. 2) 
(Fall) 

HDS 435: ORIGINS AND ESCHATOLOGY 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning the origins of man, the 
world and evil; a correlative investigation of finality and eschatological 
symbolism. Yearly. McELWAIN (Sec. 1) 

KNITTER (Sec. 2) 
(Spring) 

HDS 440: CHRISTOLOGY 

An investigation of the structure and meaning of the Christian under- 



52 



standing of salvation with particular emphasis on the problem of Chris- 
tian origins. Yearly. HAYES (Sec. 1) 

McELWAIN (Sec. 2) 
(Winter) 



HDS 445: THEOLOGY OF THE CHURCH 

A study of the origins of the Church; the relation of the Kingdom to 
the Church; the basic images and themes in Scripture and tradition; the 
development of ecclesiastical office; and the relation of the Church to the 
world. Yearly. KNITTER 

(Winter) 



HDS 447: CHURCH AND STRUCTURE: THEOLOGY OF LAW 

A study of ecclesiological thought and attempts to concretize the theory, 
particularly in legal structures. The course involves historical survey, 
as well as examination of the contemporary tensions between theory 
and structure. Treats theory and practical problems of interpretation of 
law in the contemporary Church. Yearly. BONNER 

(Fall) 



HDS 450: THEOLOGY OF THE EUCHARIST 

A study of the scriptural origins and historical development of the 
eucharistic liturgy, with particular emphasis on the eucharistic prayer. 
Theological reflection on the meaning of eucharist in light of the above 
and of contemporary discussion. Consideration of current questions, 
e.g., ecumenical questions of intercommunion and eucharistic ministry. 
Yearly. OSTDIEK (Fall) 

JOHNSON (Winter) 



HDS 455: SACRAMENTS OF INITIATION 

General sacramental theology and the problem of contemporary symbols. 
Christian initiation, its institutional process and theology. The disin- 
tegration of the initiation structural process and the resultant Western 
theology of baptism and confirmation. The problem of infant baptism, 
physical sacramentalism and the response of faith. Yearly. OSTDIEK 

(Winter) 



HDS 460: SACRAMENTS OF HEALING AND VOCATION 

The origins and historical development of penance, anointing, marriage, 
ordination. Questions of contemporary theological significance and cele- 
bration of these sacraments. Yearly. OSTDIEK and JOHNSON 

(Spring) 

53 



HDS 475: THEOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIAL ETHICS 



This course stems from the need for Christian ethics to work out of a 
valid image (or, rather, valid images) of man if it is to speak with 
authority of such things as ethical values and disvalues. What prevailing 
or at least widespread images of man are discernible in literature, philos- 
ophy and the social and behavioral sciences? What does our biblical 
heritage have to say to us as we grope among and through these for 
viable images of man today? 1972. CROTTY 

(Fall) 

HDS 480: LOVE AND COMMUNITY AS ETHICAL AIMS 

Given the present-day stress on love as having primacy and centrality 
in the New Testament ethics and Christian morality and given that the 
mission both of Christ and of the Christian is a ministry of reconcilia- 
tion, what meaning and implications do the concepts of "love" and "com- 
munity" hold for the Christian moral agent? 1973. CROTTY 

(Spring) 

HDS 491: DEVELOPMENT OF CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY II 

A survey course of the spiritual writers from St. Ambrose to St. Bernard*. 
The emphasis will be contact with the actual writings of these Christians, 
trying to discern their relationship with God. Special emphasis will be 
put on their teachings on the spiritual life. 1972. ISABELL 

(Fall) 

HDS 495: FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF SPIRITUAL 
GROWTH 

Concentrating on the experiential aspects of Christian revelation, the 
course will analyze the inner source of Christian life "in Christ," its 
psychological implications, the meaning of sin in realizing the Chris- 
tian project, and the reality of progress, religious experience to faith 
experience, way of prayer, night of the senses and of the spirit, and the 
social dimensions of spiritual growth. Special emphasis on the antinomies 
of religious living. 1973. ISABELL 

(Spring) 

HDS 515: ART OF CHRISTIAN CELEBRATION 

A study of the nature of ritual and the laws of ritual development. 
Analysis of the constitutive elements of rite (sign and symbol, language, 
gesture, music, dance) and their relationship to the ministerial role in 
celebration. A consideration of certain problems and developments in 
liturgical experimentation. Yearly. JOHNSON 

(Winter) 



54 



HDS 516: THE LITURGICAL YEAR 

A study of the origins and evolution of the liturgical calendar with a 
view toward the preparation of contemporary celebrations of Christian 
seasons and feasts. 1973. JOHNSON 

(Spring) 

HDS 520: THEOLOGY OF KARL RAHNER 

A study of the philosophical orientation of Rahner and its implications 
in his theological writings. 1973. HAYES 

(Spring) 

HDS 523: PROCESS PHILOSOPHY AND TEILHARDIAN 
'HYPERPHYSICS' 

The writings of Teilhard can be read in a variety of ways: as evolu- 
tionary science, as poetry and mysticism, as natural theology and as 
Christian theology. This particular seminar considers another dimension 
of Teilhard, that is, his 'hyperphysics' which can be seen as process 
metaphysics, especially in relation to Whitehead's philosophy of process. 
1973. McELWAIN 

(Spring) 

HDS 541: THEOLOGY OF PLAY— FESTIVITY AND FANTASY 

An effort to uncover significantly new resources for theology in festivity, 
fantasy and the renewed appraisal of homo ludens. Of particular in- 
terest will be works by: Cox, Huizinga, Keen, Novak, Rieper, etc 
1973. McELWAIN 

(Winter) 

HDS 545: THEOLOGY OF RELIGIONS 

This seminar course will center on a comparison of Paul Tillich's and 
Karl Rahner's evaluations of the non-Christian religions. 1972 

KNITTER 
(Fall) 

HDS 565: THEOLOGY OF THE WORD IN ST. BONA VENTURE 

A study of the theology of the word in the writings of Bonaventure to- 
gether with its Christological, Trinitarian, and anthropological signifi- 
cance. 1973. " HAYES 

(Winter) 

HDS 574: MODERN CONCEPTIONS OF THE SOCIAL ORDER 

This course will examine various efforts to produce a just and humane 
social order since the Enlightenment. Special emphasis will be placed 



55 



on the struggle to incorporate minority groups into a society. Authors to 
be read include Djilas, Hertzberg, John Hope Franklin, Allport, Glatzer, 
and W. Reich. 1973. PAWLIKOWSKI 

(Winter) 

HDS 576: ETHICS AND INTERNATIONAL RESPONSIBILITY 

An examination of such issues as the religious and ethical basis of U.S. 
foreign policy, war and peace, foreign aid and arms limitation. Readings 
from Marty, Niebuhr, Swomley and materials published by the Council 
on Religion and International Affairs. 1972. PAWLIKOWSKI 

(Fall) 

HDS 578: THE MINISTER AND SOCIAL INVOLVEMENT 

The course will attempt to describe some general parameters for a min- 
ister's involvement in social-political affairs. Readings will come from 
Ramsey, Niebuhr and Powers. The course will also involve meetings 
with ministers currently engaged in social action ministries. 1973. 

PAWLIKOWSKI and CROTTY 
(Winter) 

HDS 580: THE ETHICS OF CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE 

A biblical and historical study of Christian teaching regarding married 
life and an attempt to elaborate a helpful Christian ethic for contempo- 
rary marriage. Will stress the importance of the basic image of mar- 
riage underlying one's attitudes and orientation in its regard. 

CROTTY 
(Fall & Spring) 

HDS 599: M.A. SEMINAR 

Open to M.A. candidates only. The content of the seminar may vary 
according to the needs of the candidates, but some emphasis will usual- 
ly be placed on exposure to and use of various theological methodologies, 
phenomenological, historical, transcendental, etc. Yearly. VANASSE 

(Spring) 

HDS 415, 417, 420 given at Bellarmine School of Theology. 



56 



C. DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN MISSION AND MINISTRY 
(CMM). 



Staff: John Boberg, Dismas Bonner, Lois Dideon, Dennis Geaney, Damien 
Isabell, Robert Mallonee, Thomas More Newbold (Chairman), Donald 
Skerry. 

CMM 380-385-390: PASTORAL WORK PROGRAM 

The pastoral work program provides guided exposure to the social and 
ecclesiastical scene in Chicago through direct experience of select min- 
isterial activity. Reflection on this experience is correlated with course 
work being taken. Six to eight students are grouped into a team headed 
by a theological reflector. STAFF 

(Fall, Winter, Spring) 

CMM 400: THE SOURCES OF PASTORAL PSYCHOLOGY 

An historical survey of contemporary psychotherapy, with emphasis on 
Freud, Jung and the trend toward existential synthesis in psychotherapy. 
Yearly. * NEWBOLD 

(Fall) 



CMM 405: BASIC TYPES OF PASTORAL COUNSELING 

A discussion of the basic types of pastoral counseling in terms of goals, 
techniques and practices. A presentation and discussion of some typical 
situations in pastoral care. Yearly. NEWBOLD 

(Fall and Winter) 

CMM 435: THEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON MISSION 

Examination and analysis of Vatican documents; new dimensions of a 
more eschatologically oriented theology, especially for problems of de- 
velopment and relation to Non-Christian religions. BOBERG 

(Fall) 

CMM 440: CHRISTIANITY IN WORLD HISTORY 

A study of Christianity's relation to culture and cultural change a la van 
Leeuwen, Tillich, Dawson. BOBERG 

(Winter) 

CMM 445: MISSIONARY CATECHETICS 

The nature and place of catechesis in the mission of the Church; the 
end and tasks of catechesis in relation to pre-evangelization and evan- 
gelization; the theological and anthropological basis of a catechetical 
pedagogy, with special emphasis on a cross-cultural situation. BOBERG 

(Winter) 



57 



CMM 450: PRACTICUM IN PREACHING 

A workshop style criticism of written and delivered sermons. Individual 
criticism and practice using video-tape equipment. SKERRY 

(Fall and Winter) 

CMM 455: SERMON DESIGN: METHODS AND THEORY 

Study and practice in the basic elements of sermon production: creative- 
ness in sermon preparation; determining the theme; organization; style; 
delivery; and judging results. SKERRY 

(Winter) 

CMM 480-485-490: FIELD EDUCATION PROJECT: I, II, and III 

GEANEY and DIDEON 
(Year long) 

CMM 495: CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (CPE) 
CMM 486: PASTORAL TEACHER EDUCATION (PTE) 
CMM 497: PASTORAL INTERNSHIP (PI) 

CMM 495, 96 & 97: By arrangement with Director of Field Education. 

CMM 506: SEMINAR: THEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF 
FREUD AND JUNG 

A discussion of the Freudian texts on religion and morality. Reading 
and discussion of the texts of Jung on the nature of religious experience. 

NEWBOLD 
(Winter) 

CMM 508: EXISTENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY AND PASTORAL 
PRACTICE 

This course examines the important influence that existential philosophy 
has come to have upon the development of psychotherapy. Emphasis 
will be placed upon the contributions to psychotherapy made by the 
existential analysis and interpretation of individual experience in a crisis 
society. The authors studied will be: Paul Tillich, Ludwig Binswanger, 
Medard Boss, Thomas Hora, F. J. J. Buytendijk, Rollo May and Eugene 
Kahn. NEWBOLD 

(Spring) 

CMM 512: PSYCHOLOGY OF SEXUALITY 

A seminar presentation and discussions on human sexuality as the con- 
text out of which the pastoral ministry functions. The Jungian analysis 



58 



and understanding of heterosexuaJity will be the basic model used in 
studying the meaning, implications, problems and promise of human 
sexuality, in reference to the pastoral context. 

NEWBOLD and DIDEON 
(Spring) 

CMM 518: PRACTICUM IN LITURGY 

An examination of the theology and the general principles pertaining 
to liturgical celebration and the proper role of the minister in liturgy. 
Study of ritual and practical considerations in the celebration of wedding, 
funeral and sacramental liturgies. Practical, moral, canonical and pastoral 
considerations pertaining to the sacrament of penance. Special treat- 
ment of the principles of Euchristic celebration. Individual practical 
exercises in administration of penance and celebration of Eucharist. 

STAFF 
(Spring) 

CMM 520: THE MINISTER AS MANAGER 

This course is designed to give potential priests skills in management, 
particularly as applied to voluntary organizations; relevant social science 
data will be explored through lectures, readings, laboratory exercises, 
case studies, and field experience covering specific areas of management 
practice, such as group decision-making, supervision, data collection, per- 
sonal style, and organizational models. T.B.A. 

(Winter) 

CMM 522: THEORY OF GROUP DYNAMICS 

The course will be a theoretical treatment of the various types of groups 
in which a minister may find it possible to minister, of the dynamics at 
work in such groups, and of what the minister may hope to accomplish 
in such groups. SKERRY 

(Spring) 

CMM 530: READINGS IN AREA STUDIES 

Individually guided reading program in the history and culture of specific 
countries, as well as their present social, economic and religious situa- 
tions. BOBERG 

(Spring) 

CMM 535: DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY 

After a brief survey of the biblical/theological basis, this seminar type 
course emphasizes the sociological factors that bear on the process of 
Christian community formation and its relationship to community de- 
velopment on the socio-economic plane. BOBERG 

(Fall) 



59 



CMM 541: CONTEMPORARY MISSION PROBLEMS II 



An investigation of poverty in the "third world," with its distinctive 
culture; the use and misuses of development; the mission of the Church 
in relation to liberation. BOBERG 

(Spring) 

CMM 545: CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

Introduction to essential concepts of cultural anthropology with applica- 
tion to missionary work. LOISKANDL 

(Spring) 

CMM 550: THEOLOGY OF PREACHING 

An investigation of the biblical and theological foundations of the 
meaning and importance of preaching. A study of the phenomenology 
of human speech in an attempt to correlate the biblical and theological 
with today's preacher. SKERRY 

(Fall) 

CMM 555: COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA: THEIR EFFECTS 
AND USES 

An exploration of the cultural influences of communications media, his- 
torical as well as contemporary, especially the way in which they have 
effected communication trends, perception, value formation, and their 
meaning for the communication of the Word of God. SKERRY 

(Spring) 

CMM 591: THE CULTURE OF POVERTY IN CHICAGO 

On-the-site study of how our society relates to the poor. Criminal courts, 
police headquarters, public housing, County Hospital, City Hall will be 
some of the locations for our study. The course will locate the issues 
for ministry raised in this milieu. GEANEY 

(Spring) 



60 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS— 1972-1973 



FIRST YEAR COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE 


HOME 


AALEN J. 


CP. 


Hearne, Texas 


ALFVEGREN, G. 


CP. 


Whittier, California 


BEIRNE, P. 


S.V.D. 


Brisbane, Queensland, 






Austrailia 


BRICK, J. 


S.V.D. 


Victoria, Australia 


CROWLEY, T. 


CS.Sp. 


Jackson, Michigan 


DEXEL, D. 


CS.Sp. 


Royal Oak, Michigan 


DOCTOR, J. 


O.F.M. 


Mokena, Illinois 


DONOVAN, W. 


O.Praem. 


Blue Island, Illinois 


DREFFEIN, L. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


EBBESMIER, J. 


S.V.D. 


Burlington, Iowa 


FOWLER,M. 


O.F.M. 


Petosky, Michigan 


GRIESHABEE, R. 


O.S.A. 


Palos Hills, Illinois 


/HALSTEAD, J. 


O.S.A. 


Flint, Michigan 


¥ HARRINGTON, H. 


C.M.F. 


Midland, Michigan 


/HARTWAY, A. 


C.PP.S. 


Matteson, Illinois 


/ HOCHSTATTER, T. 


O.F.M. 


Mendota, Illinois 


HOLTHAUS, J. 


S.V.D. 


Decorah, Iowa 


HUELS, J. 


O.S.M. 


St. Louis, Missouri 


HUTCHINS, M. 


S.V.D. 


Dubuque, Iowa 


JABLONSKI, J. 


M.S.C. 


Youngstown, Ohio 


JOERIGHT, G. 


O.F.M. 


Middleburg Heights, Ohio 


KELIHER, M. P. 


CS.V. 


Kankakee, Illinois 


KRAMER, R. 


S.V.D. 


Waukegan, Illionis 


LENCHAK, T. 


S.V.D. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


LEWANDOWSKI, A. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mccormick, j. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


McDEVITT, T. 


CP. 


Louisville, Kentucky 


MUDD, J. 


CP. 


Louisville, Kentucky 


MURPHY, P. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


O'DONNELL, W. 


C.PP.S 


Cleveland, Ohio 


O'NEILL, M. 


CS.Sp. 


Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 


PADILLA, G 


CP. 


Texas City, Texas 


PADUCH, F. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


RAUSCH, J. 


O.F.M. 


St. Louis, Missouri 


REBANT, D. 


S.V.D. 


Midland, Michigan 


RITTER, T. 


C.M.F. 


Youngstown, Ohio 


ROMAN, M. 


O.F.M. 


San Antonio, Texas 


SCHOLBROCK, D. 


S.V.D. 


Hawkeye, Iowa 


SCHORK, J. 


CP. 


Louisville, Kentucky 


SCHRAMM, M. 


S.V.D. 


Dyersville, Iowa 


SKRIPSKY, D. 


O.F.M. 


Omaha, Nebraska 


SMITH, M. 


C.PP.S. 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


SPANGENBERG, G. 


CS.Sp. 


Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



61 



STOSKFR O 


O F M 

w.r.ivi. 


Jordan, Minnesota 


TFRRF T 


9 v n 

o. V ,JL/. 


OC. J^OUlb, xVlISSOllli 


TORMA A 


XVI.O. v>. 


/\5>niaDuia, wnio 


VARGAS E 


S.V.D. 


Nff^w "Vrvrlr Mf*Yxr "Vrvrlr 


WEBER, M. 




T Ltp Rf*n trvn A/tinn^ i cr>f"'i 
i-<«At AJV-J l n jl i, XVXJ.lHlC5t_»Ca. 


WILLENBORG, H. 


O.F.M. 


Effingham, Illinois 


WILLIAMS, J. 


CP. 


Louisville, Kentucky 


WONG, C 


S.V.D. 


Kowloon, Hong Kong 



SECOND YEAR COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE HOME 



BALIK, L. 


S.V.D. 


Fort Atkinson, Iowa 


BAUER, D. 


S.V.D. 


Toledo, Ohio 


BUJNOWSKI, P. 


CP. 


Chicago, Illinois 


CALLAHAN, V. 


O.F.M. 


Bridgeport, Connecticut 


CONLEY, J. 


CP. 


Chicago, Illinois 


CONRAD, F. 


S.V.D. 


Girard, Pennsylvania 


COTTINGHAM, P. 


C.S.Sp. 


Jacksonville, Alabama 


CURRAN, D. 


O.S.A. 


Dublin, Ireland 


DEFFENBAUGH, T. 


O.S.A. 


St. Louis, Missouri 


DENISSEN, R. 


O.Praem. 


DePere, Wisconsin 


FELDNER, W. 


S.V.D. 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


FENSKE, T. 


O.F.M. 


Parma, Ohio 


FIELD, J. 


CPP.S. 


Falls Church, Virginia 


FISCHER, A. 


O.F.M. 


Trenton, Illinois 


GINS, P. 


O.S.M. 


Columbus, Ohio 


GRUBB, F. 


O.Praem. 


Santa Fe, New Mexico 


HACKBARTH, E. 


O.Praem. 


Hilbert, Wisconsin 


HOFFMAN, G. 


CPP.S. 


Hermiston, Oregon 


HOYING, R. 


CPP.S. 


Celina, Ohio 


JAGDFELD, L. 


O.F.M. 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


JANIK, E. 


S.V.D. 


Elyria, Ohio 


KOHN, M. 


C.S.Sp. 


Detroit, Michigan 


KRANTZ, E. 


CPP.S. 


Atwater, Ohio 


LANGENKAMP, J. 


CPP.S. 


St. Henry, Ohio 


LAGANIA, R. 


S.V.D. 


New Orleans, Louisiana 


LUEBBERT, S. 


CP. 


Florissant, Missouri 


Mcquillan, c 


C.S.Sp. 


Staten Island, New York 


MARTINEZ, V. 


O.S.M. 


San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico 


MASSARO, R. 


C.S.Sp. 


Norbert, Pennsylvania 


MONZYK, J. 


CP. 


Washington, Missouri 


NAIRN, T. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


O' GRADY, D. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


PATTEN, P. 


C.S.Sp. 


Detroit, Michigan 


PETERMEIER, V. 


O.S.C 


Melrose, Minnesota 


PSZCZOLA, R. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


ROCHFORD, E. 


S.V.D. 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


RYAN, J. 


CP. 


Cleveland, Ohio 



62 



/ SIEG, R. 
THOMAN, J. 
URODA, S. 
VADNAL, R. 
VANDERVEST, L. 
WEIMAN, M. 
WINTER, R. 



O.F.M. Cleveland, Ohio 

CP. Cincinnati, Ohio 

S.V.D. Detroit, Michigan 

S.V.D. Cleveland, Ohio 

O.Pream. Luxemburg, Wisconsin 

CS.Sp. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

C.PP.S. Rensselaer, Indiana 



THIRD YEAR COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE HOME 



ALDWORTH, T. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


ANICH, K. 


S.V.D. 


Mukwonago, Wisconsin 


AUBREY, K. 


S.V.D. 


Des Plaines, Illinois 


BERNARD, R. 


S.V.D. 


St. Martinsville, Louisiana 


BALLARD, J. 


O.F.M. 


Memphis, Tennessee 


BILSKI, T. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


BOU, P. 


S.V.D. 


Chicago, Illinois 


CAPALBO, K. 


O.F.M. 


Bellwood, Illinois 


CARLOS, J. 


O.F.M. 


Joliet, Illinois 


CERTIK, R. 


CP. 


Chicago, Illinois 


CHARBONNEAU, G. 


O.S.M. 


Detroit, Michigan 


COMELLA, G. 


CPP.S. 


Waukegan, Illinois 


DaCORTE, A. 




Chicago, Illinois 


DEAN, E, 


O.F.M. 


Nashville, Tennessee 


DIESBOURG, R. 


M.S.C. 


Geneva, Illinois 


FEDERSPIEL, J. 


CP. 


Port Washington, Wisconsin 


GRAHAM, J. 




Epping, N.S.W., Australia 


HANEY, M. 


O.F.M. 


Columbus, Nebraska 


HAYES, R. 


C.M.F. 


Dunkirk, New York 


HILGERT, J. 


CP. 


Mason, Michigan 


HORSTMAN, J. 


S.V.D. 


Cloverdale, Ohio 


JADGCHEW, J. 


CPP.S. 


Parma, Ohio 


JENKINS, L. 


S.V.D. 


Palm Desert, California 


JESCHKE, R. 


S.V.D. 


Elmhurst, Illinois 


KESTERSON, J. 


O.F.M. 


Indianapolis, Indiana 


KMIEC, W. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


KRATZ, C. 


O.Praem. 


Green Bay, Wisconsin 


LESCHAK, M. 


S.V.D. 


Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 


LUKSETICH, D. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


McCABE, M. 


O.F.M. 


Madison Lake, Minnesota 


MENCSIK, J. 


CPP.S. 


Troy, Ohio 


MERTEN, f. 


O.F.M. 


Omaha, Nebraska 


OVERMANN, J. 


S.V.D. 


Jesup, Iowa 


POPPE, D. 


CP. 


Louisville, Kentucky 


REITHMAIER, P. 


O.S.M. 


Frankfort, Illinois 


SPENCER, W. 


O.F.M. 


West Monroe, Louisiana 


TAYLOR, D. 


Pittsburgh 


Cincinnati, Ohio 



63 



WILL, R. 


CPP.S. 


Chickasaw, Ohio 


WOLFF, R. 


S.V.D. 


Dayton, Ohio 


FOURTH YEAR COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE 


HOME 


BAKER, J. 


M.S.C. 


-L*v_ U CLA 1 VJ 1 1 j X ^lillO V 1 V O-l LL(X 


BRENNAN, P. 


CP. 


T /"vine Art KCAnn 
ol. JUULLlb, IVxloSUUll 


BUDENHOLZER, F. 


S.V.D. 


CI arpn A ctn T-Tilta T1!inr>i« 

Vvi U=I ^1 J IXv/l 1 X XII U, A L1A 1 1 VJX O 


CHENEVEY, R. 


CPP.S. 


C^Atm] Fnlhon Ofiir» 
v^cuiai x uiluii, vymu 


COENS, F. 


O.F.M. 


WUIIlLy) XlllllAJlJ 


GUILLORY, C. 


S.V.D. 


T a fct vf*rTf> T m n c 1 9 r» a 

MJVLl ajrCLLC, l^ULUolcUlti 


KAVCAK, J. 


M.S.C 


lNdZdlCUI, x ClJUloylvaJlia 


KOLEGA, R. 


CPP.S. 


Ch i ra <rr> T 1 1 i n ot <» 

V_vl 11 ^, U. £1 w , -1 1 1111 wl 3 


McGRATH, R. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


OHNER, J. 


O.S.A. 


V>lllt.ai£tJ, 111111010 


PAWLICKI, J. 


S.V.D. 


Rflv Citv A/firhtO'an 


PONIC, J. 


O.Praem. 


Chicago, Illinois 


STEINBRUNNER, J. 


CPP.S. 


St. Henry, Ohio 


WEBBER, D. 


CP. 


Des Moines, Iowa 


SPECIAL STUDENTS COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE 


HOME 


LAKEY, A. 




New York, New York 


LUZNICKY, G. 


O.P. 


Chicago, Illinois 



64 



1972 



1973 







JANUARY 








JULY 




s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T F 


s 


■ 

2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


1 
8 


L 


3 


4 5 6 7 


1 

o 
6 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


9 


10 


11 12 13 14 


ID 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 


LL 


23 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


L6 


24 


25 26 27 28 


90 

zy 


30 


31 








30 


31 








FEBRUARY 








AUGUST 




s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T F 


s 


• 




1 2 3 


4 


c 
3 






12 3 4 


3 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


1 1 


1 9 

il 


b 


7 


8 9 10 11 


1 9 
LL 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


Li 


14 


15 16 17 18 


1 Q 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


Lb 


on 
ZU 


21 


22 23 24 25 


ZD 


27 


28 


29 . .. 






27 


28 


29 30 31 - 








MARCH 








SEPTEMBER 




s 


M 


T W T 


F 


5 


s 


M 


T W T F 


s 






1 2 


3 








1 


2 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


\\ 


3 


4 


5 6 7 8 


9 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 13 14 15 


16 


19 


on 

L\) 


01 00 00 
Li LL ii> 


0/1 

Z4 


25 


17 


18 


19 20 21 22 


23 


26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 




24 


25 


26 27 28 29 


30 






APRIL 








OCTOBER 




s 


M 


T W T 


F 






M 


T W T F 


s 










i 
i 


i 
i 


2 


3 4 5 6 




2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 






g 


9 


10 11 12 13 


14 


g 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


ID 


15 


16 


17 18 19 20 


21 


10 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


99 

LL 


22 


23 


24 25 26 27 


28 


Lj 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


La 


29 


30 


31 




30 












NOVEMBER 








MAY 






s 


M 


T W T F 


s 


s 


M 


T W J 


F 


S 






12 3 


4 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


5 


6 


7 8 9 10 


11 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


12 


13 


14 15 16 17 


18 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


19 


20 


21 22 23 24 


25 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


26 


27 


28 29 30 




28 


29 


30 31 








DECEMBER 








JUNE 






s 


M 


T VL« T F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 






1 


2 






.. . 1 


2 


3 


3 


4 


5 6 7 8 


9 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


10 


11 


12 13 14 15 


16 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


17 


18 


19 20 21 22 


23 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


24 


25 


26 27 28 29 


30 


25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 




31 









JANUARY 



s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 27 


28 


29 


30 31 








FEBRUARY 




s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 






.. 1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


1 8 
18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 28 . 










MARCH 






s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 






. .. 1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


Lo 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 






APRIL 






s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


1 




3 4 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


29 


30 












MAY 






s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 






1 2 3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 30 31 










JUNE 






s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 



JULY 



s 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


s 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


00 

LL 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


00 

Z6 


29 


30 


31 














AUGUST 






s 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


s 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


1 Q 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


oc 
ZD 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






SEPTEMBER 




s 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


s 
1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


lb 


17 


18 


19 


20 21 


00 
LL 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 
















OCTOBER 




s 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


s 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 










NOVEMBER 




s 


M 


T 


w 


T 

1 


F 

2 


s 

3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 


28 


29 


30 






DECEMBER 




s 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


s 
1 
8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31